Fugitives: Escape from Furnace 4

Fugitives: Escape from Furnace 4

Alexander Gordon Smith

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 1250003393

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Forever altered by his experience in Furnace Penetentiary, Alex has done the impossible and escaped. But the battle for freedom is only just beginning. Charged with his superhuman abilities, Alex must uncover the last of Furnace's secrets―the truth about the man who built the prison, the man known as Alfred Furnace. And to do that he must stop running and finally confront his greatest fears.

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The First Journey (Animorphs: Alternamorphs, Book 1)

Checkmate (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell, Book 3)

Back to Before (Animorphs: Megamorphs, Book 4)

Gold Sharks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and the girl looked over, her face twisting into an expression of terror. She tucked the necklace out of sight, then pushed herself back into the bench, pulling her knees up to her chest. Her eyes were still haunted, still defiant, still fierce. ‘Don’t let him near me,’ she hissed. ‘Don’t you dare let him anywhere near me.’ ‘We told you—’ Zee started, but the girl cut him off. ‘I don’t care if he’s your friend or not; he’s a psycho. You hear me? You’re a psycho!’ I turned away as a fit of

had seen. ‘In that case, my friends, I suggest we go this way,’ said Zee, setting off along the street opposite, one that led away from the city, away from the tower. ‘That’s the wrong way,’ Simon called out after him. ‘You’re going east.’ ‘Doesn’t matter,’ Zee said over his shoulder. ‘Running into the police is the least of our worries now. Whole city is a death trap. We’re better off heading out of it while we still can.’ He was right, and I was happy to turn my back on the distant

a loan. St Christopher, he’s the patron saint of travellers, so you should take him, take him with you.’ I started to protest, as she must have known I would. ‘It’s not a gift,’ she repeated. ‘It means too much to me. Give it back when you’ve killed him, okay? Give it back to me when things are back to normal.’ ‘I will.’ ‘Promise me,’ she asked gently. And I realised she was asking for a promise not just to return the necklace, but to make things normal again. It was a promise I doubted I

wanted out. The tunnel ended after a hundred metres or so at another double door. I tried the handle and it opened, swinging out towards a staircase. At the top was a small, cramped office basement, reams of photocopying paper stacked against mouldering walls, furniture collecting dust in the corner. I pushed through the clutter, finding more stairs and heading up into an equally gloomy, equally abandoned corridor – more like somebody’s house than an office. A short walk later and I was at the

wanted out. The tunnel ended after a hundred metres or so at another double door. I tried the handle and it opened, swinging out towards a staircase. At the top was a small, cramped office basement, reams of photocopying paper stacked against mouldering walls, furniture collecting dust in the corner. I pushed through the clutter, finding more stairs and heading up into an equally gloomy, equally abandoned corridor – more like somebody’s house than an office. A short walk later and I was at the

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