Print Magazine (August 2013)

Print Magazine (August 2013)

Language: English

Pages: 92

ISBN: 3598560893

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


August 2013: Photography

Graphic design and photography go hand in hand, so we thought it was only natural to explore the connections between the two crafts in this issue. We shine a light on the working relation- ships between art director/photography duos whose collaborations you’ve surely admired for years. You’ll also learn the history behind the now ubiquitous photo format known as the “selfie.” Ellen Shapiro takes on the debate of whether digital photography has made the medi- um too accessible and thereby devalued the process and the final product. Plus, we feature the winners of our Hand Drawn Illustration Awards, another medium that plays an important role in the realm of design. — Sarah Whitman

Contributors

David Barringer, Seymour Chwast, Tim Davis, Martin Fox, Steven Heller, Jeremy Lehrer, Claire Lui, Debbie Millman, Rick Poynor, Ellen Shapiro, Jude Stewart, Rachel Swaby, Jennifer Sterling, Michelle Taute, Jurek Wajdowicz, Douglas Wolk

About Print Magazine

Print is a bimonthly magazine about visual culture and design. Founded in 1940 by William Edwin Rudge, Print is dedicated to showcasing the extraordinary in design on and off the page. Covering a field as broad as communication itself—publication and book design, animation and motion graphics, corporate branding and rock posters, exhibitions and street art—Print covers commercial, social, and environmental design from every angle. Engagingly written by cultural reporters and critics who look at design in its social, political, and historical contexts, Print explores why our world looks the way it looks, and why the way it looks matters.

http://www.printmag.com/

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art directed for Apartamento (far right) and a Mercedes-Benz magazine. 5 4 P R I N T 6 7. 2 A P R I L 2 0 1 3 APR13_nva-FINAL.indd 54 2/5/13 6:59 PM sible. It was this diversity and composure as a designer that led Astrid Stavro to hire Domínguez in 2007. “She walked in one day and showed me her portfolio, and I hired her on the spot,” Stavro says. Bread sculptures and Whatercolour Fruits—a recent project featuring actual pieces of fruit that have been peeled and painted with watercolors—risk

Gwangju, Korea LIVES IN: Brooklyn Stills from the video Kim made for the School of Visual Arts’ 2011 motiongraphics show 6 0 P R I N T 6 7. 2 A P R I L 2 0 1 3 APR13_nva4.indd 60 2/1/13 10:50 PM officer of Google Labs, says, “She’s inventing the future that potentially billions of people will experience.” That’s a tall order for a 24-year-old, but Kim, who was born in South Korea, has been precocious her whole life. At the age of 14, she moved out of her parents’ house and lived on her

of graffiti colors, and candy-colored insanity poured from his pen. The lesson he took from graffiti was: Pick a style and spam it. He got noticed, got clients, got paid. But in the end he got sick of it. Superoboturbo was dead. Van den Nieuwendijk stepped up out of the grave a man, ready to do work in any style that was needed. Phil Lubliner, a partner at Other Means, the firm that acts as an art director for Bloomberg View, says, “His work is graphic, poppy, aggressive. He’s very playful, and he

Cumberland County teenagers demonstrate that good design can sprout anywhere. By Martin Fox I n the November/December 1971 issue, Print published a five-page story on an art and literary magazine. It wasn’t the first to be showcased in our pages, nor was it a surprising choice of subject matter: A magazine with such high-toned content could almost be required to look good. What may have surprised our readers, as it did Print staffers at the time, was that the publication, titled Jetstream, was

Università decided in 2002 to transform its seal into a logo, it retained many of these symbolic features; the history of such an august institution demanded that the logo designer stick close to the original. History and tradition govern the look of many contemporary academic seals. Take the one that the University of Denver has APR13_evolution3.indd 8 used for more than 65 years. It incorporates imagery emblematic of UD’s heritage and, according to an online description, “speaks to the

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